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Empire: Total War Heaven » Forums » The Red Lion Tavern » Now Reading?
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Topic Subject:Now Reading?
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Awesome Eagle
Spear of Mars
(id: awesomated88)
posted 04-12-12 11:07 PM EDT (US)         
So what are you currently in the midst of?

i am currently in the midst of Air Force by Ian Mcphedran. Very awesome book that details the new era in Australian Air power. Very detailed and reasearched with a righting style that keeps you interested. Very Recommended for the Aussies out there(Pitt..)

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it- George Santayana
History is a guide to navigation in perilous times. History is who we are and why we are the way we are- David C. McCullough
Wars not make one great- Yoda
AuthorReplies:
BastWorshiper
Sensei
posted 07-16-12 12:05 PM EDT (US)     51 / 284       
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain, Expanded Universe which is a collection of Robert Heinlein short stories, We Can Remember It for You Wholesale which is a collection of Philip K. Dick short stories and the title of the story on which the movie "Total Recall" was based, and The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View of the Search for God by Carl Sagan

"It is impossible to enjoy idling thoroughly unless one has plenty of work to do. There is no fun in doing nothing when you have nothing to do.
Wasting time is merely an occupation then, and a most exhausting one. Idleness, like kisses, to be sweet must be stolen." -- Jerome K. Jerome

"Some people become so expert at reading between the lines they don't read the lines." -- Margaret Millar

ERADICATE CONDESCENSION! (That means don't talk down to people.)
Ecthelion
Mariner
(id: p90pro)
posted 07-26-12 05:31 AM EDT (US)     52 / 284       
We Can Remember It for You Wholesale which is a collection of Philip K. Dick short stories and the title of the story on which the movie "Total Recall"
One of my favorite authors. I'd recommend getting the Library of America set of his books.

Sir, I have not yet begun to defile myself.
Swallow my pride? No thank you, Im too full of myself.
I bring you nothing but love and a shopping bag full of sexual depravity.
I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
Tied with Meteora (****er) for Best Sig Award.
BastWorshiper
Sensei
posted 07-26-12 10:53 AM EDT (US)     53 / 284       
One of my favorites, as well.

Thanks for the recommendation. I checked out the Library of America sets, and most are, unfortunately, superfluous for my collection. However, from the last set, I only own VALIS; so that is probably a worthwhile investment.

"It is impossible to enjoy idling thoroughly unless one has plenty of work to do. There is no fun in doing nothing when you have nothing to do.
Wasting time is merely an occupation then, and a most exhausting one. Idleness, like kisses, to be sweet must be stolen." -- Jerome K. Jerome

"Some people become so expert at reading between the lines they don't read the lines." -- Margaret Millar

ERADICATE CONDESCENSION! (That means don't talk down to people.)
Ecthelion
Mariner
(id: p90pro)
posted 07-28-12 03:48 AM EDT (US)     54 / 284       
You can get them seperately. Don't have to get all three in a set.

Sir, I have not yet begun to defile myself.
Swallow my pride? No thank you, Im too full of myself.
I bring you nothing but love and a shopping bag full of sexual depravity.
I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
Tied with Meteora (****er) for Best Sig Award.
srlj3721
Mariner
posted 07-28-12 04:00 AM EDT (US)     55 / 284       
one seris i reccomend is the ender series by orson scott card

a bit confusing book order but a great series

Rome 2 is coming
celebrate with this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZIPeGN7CPQ

[This message has been edited by srlj3721 (edited 07-28-2012 @ 04:01 AM).]

Enkidu of Uruk
Mariner
(id: thekid951)
posted 07-28-12 05:35 PM EDT (US)     56 / 284       
Occupy by Noam Chomsky (2012), a great read, and Collapse by the ever-great Jarred Diamond.

Awesome Eagle
Spear of Mars
(id: awesomated88)
posted 08-18-12 07:29 PM EDT (US)     57 / 284       
Almost finished Operation Sealion by Peter Fleming.
Very interesting read. Talks about the state of the Home Guard, the intelligence each side had about the other, How Hitler desperately wanted capitulation rather than invasion etc..

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it- George Santayana
History is a guide to navigation in perilous times. History is who we are and why we are the way we are- David C. McCullough
Wars not make one great- Yoda
Earl Scruffles
Mariner
(id: generalscruff)
posted 08-19-12 10:44 AM EDT (US)     58 / 284       
How much did it discuss the naval aspect? Ie, the likelihood any invasion would have been cut off by sea and destroyed.

A Storm of Swords, the 3rd book in the A Song of Ice and Fire series

But I won't go to England due to the prescence of scruffy in shottingham. - Scenter102
This is Scruff we are talking about. I can't think of anything I don't see Scruff doing just for the hell of it. - Agrippa 271
The cake was made by Scruffy and it was... a rude shape. - Liam
monkey in a suit on a cycle - Scenter102 describing Scruffy
Scenter102
Mariner
posted 08-19-12 02:09 PM EDT (US)     59 / 284       
Reading the same as scruff and Roman Warfare by Aldrin Goldworthy (rereading)
Awesome Eagle
Spear of Mars
(id: awesomated88)
posted 08-21-12 06:16 AM EDT (US)     60 / 284       
How much did it discuss the naval aspect? Ie, the likelihood any invasion would have been cut off by sea and destroyed.
It touches on it, but doesnt go into over arching detail. It mostly deals with planning, intelligence, the situations in both supreme commands etc.. really good though

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it- George Santayana
History is a guide to navigation in perilous times. History is who we are and why we are the way we are- David C. McCullough
Wars not make one great- Yoda

[This message has been edited by Awesome Eagle (edited 08-21-2012 @ 06:17 AM).]

SongsOfBeitar
Mariner
posted 08-21-12 09:28 AM EDT (US)     61 / 284       
Anybody have recommendations for some good historical fiction set in ancient times?
Also, I'm looking for a good authoritative book on the history of the roman empire but I have no idea what to get. I need something meant for an individual with only basic knowledge of the time period but without being a "Roman Empire for Dummies".
Thanks!
Scenter102
Mariner
posted 08-21-12 09:59 AM EDT (US)     62 / 284       
IF you don't mond it not being a book the History of Rome Podcast on youtube is pretty good.
Awesome Eagle
Spear of Mars
(id: awesomated88)
posted 08-21-12 05:03 PM EDT (US)     63 / 284       
The History of Rome Podcast is fantastic and i massively reccomend it! you can also get it via itunes and download it to listen to on your ipod etc..

I am now reading Call-sign Hades by Patrick Dury. Its about the war in Afghanistan and the first chapter gave me chills..:/

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it- George Santayana
History is a guide to navigation in perilous times. History is who we are and why we are the way we are- David C. McCullough
Wars not make one great- Yoda
Awesome Eagle
Spear of Mars
(id: awesomated88)
posted 09-14-12 09:32 PM EDT (US)     64 / 284       
That Call Sign Hades book was awesome btw..

Now reading Vietnam-Australia's War by Paul Ham.. Really good and i am only 200 pages into it..

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it- George Santayana
History is a guide to navigation in perilous times. History is who we are and why we are the way we are- David C. McCullough
Wars not make one great- Yoda
Ecthelion
Mariner
(id: p90pro)
posted 09-15-12 08:34 PM EDT (US)     65 / 284       
Just went to the used book store and got...

Constantine's Sword which explores the Catholic Churches involvement in stoking anti-semitism for almost two thousand years.
Guns, Germs, and Steel. I think we all know what it's about, but I'm finally reading it only now.
Pygmy, by Chuck Palahniuk(sp?) Young commie sleeper agents plot to do something in America. I'm going to save it for the plane ride to Hawaii.

All for twenty bucks. Not bad.

Sir, I have not yet begun to defile myself.
Swallow my pride? No thank you, Im too full of myself.
I bring you nothing but love and a shopping bag full of sexual depravity.
I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
Tied with Meteora (****er) for Best Sig Award.
bdf101
Mariner
posted 09-15-12 10:39 PM EDT (US)     66 / 284       
The History of Rome Podcast is fantastic
Scenter102
Mariner
posted 09-15-12 10:54 PM EDT (US)     67 / 284       
Reading the Penguin book translation of Polybious, and Mother tonge by Bryson (I would recomend it).


Anyone know a good book after polybius finishes his history for a chronological effect. An ancient historian is prefered.
Alex_the_Bold
Mariner
posted 09-16-12 03:22 AM EDT (US)     68 / 284       
I'd recommend Livy, Scenter, as he writes about the period from the foundation of Rome to Augustus...

Invincibility lies in defence, while the possibility of victory in the attack -Sun Tzu
Akouson me, pataxon de (hit me, but first listen to me)-Themistocles to Euribiadis prior to the battle of Salamis.
Pitt
Commodore
posted 09-16-12 06:52 AM EDT (US)     69 / 284       
For the second century BC there's Livy and some parts of Cassius Dio. Sallust's Jugurthine War also covers the war at the end of the century, in which Gaius Marius rose to prominence.

For the first century BC, history becomes thicker. Sallust's short work on Catiline's conspiracy has survived, though his history of the civil war between Sulla and the Marian's survives only in fragments. Caesar's Commentaries cover the conquest of Gaul and much of the civil war.

Appian's is the only history covering the various Roman civil wars of the first century BC to survive practically intact. It's also, along with parts of Cassius Dio, the main history covering the wars against Mithridates of Pontus (apart from some material in Plutarch's biography of Sulla).

Plutarch's Lives might be the best thing to follow on from Polybius. Each biography is self-contained, easy enough to follow, and it represents a major source for the history of the periods its subjects lived in.

"Into the face of the young man who sat on the terrace of the Hotel Magnifique at Cannes there had crept a look of furtive shame, the shifty, hangdog look which announces that an Englishman is about to talk French." - P.G. Wodehouse, The Luck of the Bodkins

[This message has been edited by Pitt (edited 09-16-2012 @ 10:58 AM).]

Punic Hebil
Centurion
(id: Punic Hoplite)
posted 09-23-12 12:49 PM EDT (US)     70 / 284       
As a belated birthday present, my parents got me No Easy Day by Mark Owen. Talks of his experience as a SEAL and the Bin Laden raid. As well as Salammbo by Gustave Flaubert. Pretty famous book in it's day, it's a novel about Carthage. That's all I know of it so far. I've focused on reading the SEAL book first.

I am the Carthaginian who became an angel, and surrendered his wings for a life on the sea of battle.

My magic screen is constantly bombarded with nubile young things eager to please these old eyes. This truly is a wonderful period in which to exist! - Terikel the Deflowerer
Earl Scruffles
Mariner
(id: generalscruff)
posted 09-23-12 04:05 PM EDT (US)     71 / 284       
Currently reading 'When the Lights Went Out' about Britain in the 1970s

But I won't go to England due to the prescence of scruffy in shottingham. - Scenter102
This is Scruff we are talking about. I can't think of anything I don't see Scruff doing just for the hell of it. - Agrippa 271
The cake was made by Scruffy and it was... a rude shape. - Liam
monkey in a suit on a cycle - Scenter102 describing Scruffy
Enkidu of Uruk
Mariner
(id: thekid951)
posted 09-25-12 09:43 AM EDT (US)     72 / 284       
"A History of Sweden" by F.D. Scott. A pretty basic introduction.

Scenter102
Mariner
posted 09-25-12 07:21 PM EDT (US)     73 / 284       
Currently reading To Kill a Mockingbird and The Rise of Rome, by Polybious (Can't get further 'cause of shool reading stuff). Whats a good translation of Livy?
Pitt
Commodore
posted 09-25-12 11:50 PM EDT (US)     74 / 284       
The Penguin editions are good enough, though the text has been abridged in places. Livy wrote 142 books of his History, of which 35 have survived.

Penguin has published them in four volumes:

1. The Early History of Rome (Books I - V)
2. Rome and Italy (Books VI - X)
3. The War with Hannibal (Books XXI - XXX)
4. Rome and the Mediterranean (Books XXXI - XLV)


One thing to bear in mind, however, is that Livy's work should not be read like modern history. It is nowhere near as reliable, its sources are uncertain (and in some cases may have been wholly invented), and its themes of social discord 'between the orders' were highly influenced by the civil wars of Livy's life.

Betty Radice's Introduction to Rome and Italy:

Many have judged that Livy's literary virtuosity outshines his historical acumen. For the Emperor Caligula he was a 'wordy and inaccurate historian'... But even Quintilian, who properly appreciates Livy as a stylist, thinks that the 'rich creaminess' of his writing - the much quoted lactea ubertas - does not inspire confidence in his reliability. Perhaps no one has been so blunt as Macauley, who declared roundly that 'No historian, with whom we are acquainted, has shown so complete an indifference to truth. He seems to have cared only about the picturesque effects of his book, and the honour of his country.'


C.S. Kraus and A.J. Woodman, "Latin Historians", Greece and Rome. New Surveys In the Classics, No. 27 (1997), pp. 2-4

... the careers of these writers [Livy's predecessors] cover the period from (roughly) 200 BC to 35 BC. But, since the traditional date for the foundation of Rome is the mid-eighth century BC, we are left with an interval of over five hundred years during which no history was written in Rome at all. Where, then, did the earliest historians derive their information for the earliest centuries of Rome?

The traditional story of how history grew at Rome is that told by Cicero and elaborated by later critics: it is a dismal tale of plain, unadorned, thin narratives, a mere 'compilation of chronicles' (Cic. De orat. 2.52 annalium confectio) even up through the orator's own lifetime...

According to this picture, Roman history began with the (lost) Annales maximi, a year-by-year chronicle that is said to have been posted for public view on white boards (tabulae dealbatae), later codified in some form, perhaps as a large inscription, and maintained by the pontifex maximus (high priest). It is said to have dated back (perhaps) to the fifth century BC and to have contained the names of annual magistrates and other officials, and notices of famines and eclipses and of primarily ritual material. Yet, even if the earliest historians had access to a record which pre-dated themselves by so long a time, there still remains a period of about three centuries from the founding of the city for which no information other than some form of traditional memory was available, but which Livy nevertheless took four books (more than 300 pages of Oxford Text) to describe.

... The consensus of modern research is that the Romans had a persistent disregard for the retrieval of information, which no doubt explains the commonly accepted view that 'Roman historians did not, as a general rule, carry out original research.' As far as we can tell, in fact, from the very beginning historians of early Rome primarily used other written historians as sources, modelling their own work on, and polemically engaging with, their precursors' in ways generally familiar to us from the work of poets... The earliest Roman historian, Fabius Pictor, who wrote in Greek, looked, as Cornell has remarked [in The Beginnings of Rome (1995)], to the canons and methods of Greek historiography, using Greek accounts of early Rome as his source...

Roman historians did on occasion consult the research of others, conveniently grouped under the general heading of 'antiquarian'. Even here, however, it does not follow that their methods were the same as ours: for instance, Livy famously refers to 'sources' (auctores) in the plural when he means a single source; and it has been argued that many 'scholarly' conventions of historiographical narrative are purely mendacious. What is more, as Cicero and Livy knew, antiquarian genealogical research was itself often characterized by distortion and free invention (Cic. Brut. 62, Livy 8.40.4-5). Finally, none of these possible sources for early Roman history provided more than a bare-bones structure, nothing like the elaborate narratives we find in Livy and others. [fn: "Scholars often speak of a 'hard core' of factual information that was preserved , to be elaborated by freely invented details."] It is certainly true that by the time Fabius Pictor wrote, the Romans had a 'highly developed sense of their past', and it has been argued that the remarkably coherent account of early Roman history found in the extant sources can only be explained as relying on the 'collective, and accepted, oral memory of the nation': that is, oral tradition and the fierce Roman sense of identity themselves constitute an important source for early Rome. as Cornell has reminded us, however, this sense of the last is not unproblematic: 'the historical tradition of the Roman Republic was not an authenticated official record or an objective critical reconstruction; rather, it was an ideological construct designed to control, to justify, and to inspire.'

"Into the face of the young man who sat on the terrace of the Hotel Magnifique at Cannes there had crept a look of furtive shame, the shifty, hangdog look which announces that an Englishman is about to talk French." - P.G. Wodehouse, The Luck of the Bodkins

[This message has been edited by Pitt (edited 09-26-2012 @ 00:49 AM).]

Scenter102
Mariner
posted 09-26-12 06:08 AM EDT (US)     75 / 284       
Pitt, you just love making extraordinarly long posts don't you . Thank you for the complete answer though.

So is believing Livy like believing a news agency?
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